How does Billy describe Dresden after the fire-bombing? … He than travels in time to Dresden and to Tralfamador.

Similarly, What irony do you see in the situation with the POW Englishmen?

What irony do you see in the situation with the POW Englishmen? They were both depressed and felt life was meaningless ever since their traumatic war experiences. Eliot showed Billy a bunch of science fiction books by Kilgore Trout.

Additionally, What similes metaphors does Billy use to describe Dresden and the bombing? This simile is comparing Dresden to the moon, barren and empty. The moon contains no human life and is “nothing but minerals” as Vonnegut describes, meaning that it is uninhabitable, just like Dresden is now, which shows how destructive the bombing of Dresden is.

What does Billy do when rumfoord tells him that Dresden did need to be bombed?

Billy breaks his silence and tells Rumfoord that he was in Dresden when it was bombed, but Rumfoord does not take him seriously. He says that Billy is suffering from echolalia, a mental disease that makes people repeat things they hear. Billy travels to 1945 Germany.

How is the arrival in Dresden described?

How is Edgar Derby elected head American? … Describe the Americans’ arrival in Dresden. Short train ride, relatively comfortable, when they arrived the city was functioning. Describe the Americans’ “home away from home.”

How do the Germans in the camp feel about the English POWs Slaughterhouse Five?

Because they look like every stereotype of an Englishman you could imagine, the Germans love them. The Englishmen seem mostly to be foils (contrasts) of the American soldiers, who in comparison are ill-fed, under-trained, exhausted, and unprepared for war.

Why did the Germans like the English POWs Slaughterhouse 5?

The German major loves the English prisoners because they look like what soldiers should look like. Conversely, he is disgusted by the Americans, who are all in poor physical shape.

What does the hobo on the POW box car saying their situation isn’t so bad suggest about war?

The hobo’s comment is designed to show that suffering is relative. The hobo is older than the soliers who are locked with him in the box car, and this gives him more things to compare their situation with.

What is the only thing Billy cries about in the war?

Just as the quoted carol describes “the little Lord Jesus” not crying at all, Vonnegut describes Billy as crying very little, “though he often saw things worth crying about.” The only time Billy cries in the war is when he sees the miserable condition of the horses, but he somehow refrains from crying about every other

What does poo tee weet mean?

So, Vonnegut chooses to end the book with “Poo-tee-weet?” in order to allude to the uselessness of commenting on something as horrific as a war. “Poo-tee-weet” effectively means nothing; to end the book with a meaningless statement, an answerless question, echoes our inability to account for the devastation of war.

What literary devices are used in Slaughterhouse Five?


Literary Devices in Slaughterhouse-Five

  • Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory. After the bombing of Dresden, Billy Pilgrim and several POWs return to the slaughterhouse to pick up souvenirs. …
  • Setting. …
  • Narrator Point of View. …
  • Genre. …
  • Tone. …
  • Writing Style. …
  • What’s Up With the Title? …
  • What’s Up With the Epigraph?

What is rumfoord’s reaction to the bombing of Dresden?

[H]e said to Rumfoord, “I was in Dresden when it was bombed. I was a prisoner of war.” Rumfoord sighed impatiently. “Word of honor,” said Billy Pilgrim. “Do you believe me?” “Must we talk about it now?” said Rumfoord.

What does rumfoord want the people at the hospital to do to for Billy?

What does Professor Rumfoord think the hospital should do with Billy? Let him die. What is Rumfoord talking to his wife about?

What does rumfoord think of Billy?

Rumfoord believes Billy is weak, and that “weak people deserve to die.” Billy comes unstuck and is back outside Dresden, two days after the end of the war in Europe, May 1945.

How is Dresden described in Chapter 6?

Informing the Americans that they will be leaving the prison camp that very afternoon for Dresden, the English officer describes Dresden as an open city: It is undefended and contains no war industries or troop concentrations. In Dresden, they need not worry about being bombed.

What is the meaning of poo tee weet?

So, Vonnegut chooses to end the book with “Poo-tee-weet?” in order to allude to the uselessness of commenting on something as horrific as a war. “Poo-tee-weet” effectively means nothing; to end the book with a meaningless statement, an answerless question, echoes our inability to account for the devastation of war.

What was Billy’s happiest moment?

The happiest moment in Billy’s life ends in tears for the plight of two beleaguered beasts of burden. Billy’s interaction with the historian in the Vermont hospital shows how history and fiction are to some degree interchangeable in Slaughterhouse-Five.

What is the German city where Billy is imprisoned as a POW?

In Kurt Vonnegut’s book Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Children’s Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death, the main character Billy Pilgrim is captured by the Germans and taken to Dresden.

What positive attributes of Dresden does the Englishman share with the American POWs?

What positive attributes of Dresden does the Englishman share with the American POWs? It has flowers, entertainment, women, dogs, cats, trees, etc. How is Edgar Derby elected head American? Nobody nominated anyone, the Englishman nominated Derby, he asks for “all in favor”, only a couple people say yes.

How do the American prisoners and German guards survive the bombing of Dresden?

Disrupted by the sound of air raid sirens, everyone takes shelter in a meat locker deep beneath the slaughterhouse. Bombs are not dropped on Dresden that night, but the prisoners and their guards remain underground.

What did German soldiers find on Billy when they search him?

Weary and Billy’s captors, a small group of German irregulars, take their valuables and discover an obscene photograph in Weary’s pocket. As Billy lies in the snow, he sees an image of Adam and Eve in the polished boots of the commander.

What play do the British soldiers put on for Billy and the rest of the American POWs?

That night in the Englishmen’s compound, the English officers perform a musical version of Cinderella. Watching it, Billy begins to laugh hysterically, and then he begins to shriek. He continues shrieking until he is carried out of the shed to the hospital, where he is tied down in bed and given a shot of morphine.

What are Billy’s final words?

Billy says he already knows that he will die because an old, crazed Lazzaro will keep his promise. … Moments after he predicts his own death and closes his speech with the words “Farewell, hello, farewell, hello,” Billy is killed by an assassin’s high-powered laser gun.

What is the significance of the narrator’s repeated comment so it goes and what attitude do you think it is meant to express?

Billy appreciates the simplicity of the Tralfamadorian response to death, and every time he encounters a dead person, he “simply shrug[s]” and says “so it goes.” The repetition of this phrase also illustrates how war desensitizes people to death, since with each passive mention of “so it goes,” the narrator is subtly …